Intersection Upgrade - Greaves Road and Berwick Springs Promenade

Consultation has concluded

Application considered at Council meeting

Council’s planning committee will be meeting on Tuesday 8 August at 6.30 pm. One of the topics under consideration will be the permit application for construction of a roundabout at Greaves Road. Due to significant public interest in the proposal, the meeting will be streamed online via our Facebook page. Visit www.casey.vic.gov.au/council/minutes-agendas to view the meeting agenda.

Application received

Application for Planning Permit PlnA00169/17 has been received as for the upgrade of the roundabout at the intersection of Greaves Road and Berwick-Springs Promenade / Ward Road extension. The roundabout is a strategic infrastructure item identified in the Berwick Waterways Precinct Structure Plan and Development Contributions Plan. The upgraded roundabout will help to:

  • Facilitate safe and efficient movement of vehicles along Greaves Road as well as to and from Berwick Springs Promenade / the Ward Road Extension now and into the future.
  • Provide for Pedestrian Operated Signals which will provide safe pedestrian links between land on the north side of Greaves Road and the Melbourne Water wetlands and parkland on the south side of Greaves Road.
  • To provide for general improved vehicle, cycle and pedestrian links between the south side of Greaves Road and land to the north of the Hallam Valley Contour Drain.

Formal notification of the application is currently being conducted with the full suite of planning documentation available for viewing at www.casey.vic.gov.au/apa

Council has also prepared a range of general topic based FAQ’s which provide an easy to read outline of the background associated with the application.

If you would like further information or a question that wasn't answered in the FAQ, then ask it below.

Application considered at Council meeting

Council’s planning committee will be meeting on Tuesday 8 August at 6.30 pm. One of the topics under consideration will be the permit application for construction of a roundabout at Greaves Road. Due to significant public interest in the proposal, the meeting will be streamed online via our Facebook page. Visit www.casey.vic.gov.au/council/minutes-agendas to view the meeting agenda.

Application received

Application for Planning Permit PlnA00169/17 has been received as for the upgrade of the roundabout at the intersection of Greaves Road and Berwick-Springs Promenade / Ward Road extension. The roundabout is a strategic infrastructure item identified in the Berwick Waterways Precinct Structure Plan and Development Contributions Plan. The upgraded roundabout will help to:

  • Facilitate safe and efficient movement of vehicles along Greaves Road as well as to and from Berwick Springs Promenade / the Ward Road Extension now and into the future.
  • Provide for Pedestrian Operated Signals which will provide safe pedestrian links between land on the north side of Greaves Road and the Melbourne Water wetlands and parkland on the south side of Greaves Road.
  • To provide for general improved vehicle, cycle and pedestrian links between the south side of Greaves Road and land to the north of the Hallam Valley Contour Drain.

Formal notification of the application is currently being conducted with the full suite of planning documentation available for viewing at www.casey.vic.gov.au/apa

Council has also prepared a range of general topic based FAQ’s which provide an easy to read outline of the background associated with the application.

If you would like further information or a question that wasn't answered in the FAQ, then ask it below.

Consultation has concluded
  • Berwick Spring Estate and East-West Corridor Planning

    over 2 years ago
    Map 1
    What is the issue?

    »During the development of Berwick Springs Estate, the developer constructed Greaves Road to meet Council standards that allowed for an asphalt road and a small interim roundabout at the estate entrance i.e. at Berwick Springs Promenade/Greaves Road.

    »The roundabout and entrance were attractively landscaped to market the estate to prospective buyers.
    »The gateway entrance, bluestone wall and mature treeline sit on Melbourne Water land.

    What is Council’s Role?

    »Roads that provide a regional or metropolitan arterial function typically form part of the Declared Arterial Road Network and come under the State’s direct responsibility through VicRoads. In...
    What is the issue?

    »During the development of Berwick Springs Estate, the developer constructed Greaves Road to meet Council standards that allowed for an asphalt road and a small interim roundabout at the estate entrance i.e. at Berwick Springs Promenade/Greaves Road.

    »The roundabout and entrance were attractively landscaped to market the estate to prospective buyers.
    »The gateway entrance, bluestone wall and mature treeline sit on Melbourne Water land.

    What is Council’s Role?

    »Roads that provide a regional or metropolitan arterial function typically form part of the Declared Arterial Road Network and come under the State’s direct responsibility through VicRoads. In growth areas arterial roads are typically constructed in stages - initially as a single carriageway local arterial and then handed over to VicRoads through the Arterial Road Declaration process as the traffic function of the road becomes more regional.

    »Over some years, Council has been working with VicRoads on the arterial road network in Casey that services the City and the broader community.

    »Greaves Road will ultimately be declared as an arterial road and is in the final stages of ‘handover’ to VicRoads as a Declared Arterial Road. The handover process set by VicRoads requires Council to make improvements to the road (at Council’s cost, to the satisfaction of VicRoads) before VicRoads will accept responsibility for the road. For this reason, handover can take several years to achieve.

    What is Council’s position?
    »During preparation of the South East Growth Corridor Plan in 2012, the Victorian Planning Authority [VPA] (formerly known as the Metropolitan Planning Authority and before that, the Growth Areas Authority) further reinforced Greaves Road as a key east-west arterial road connecting the Princes Freeway in the east and Pound Road in the west, then linking to the employment land in South Dandenong.

    »The South East Growth Corridor Plan was approved by the State Government and is a Reference Document in the Casey Planning Scheme. All government agencies involved in the planning of the south east growth corridor must adhere to the strategic intent of the document.

    »In essence, Greaves Roads’ status as a local road has been an interim position, with Greaves Road having been identified and planned for as a key arterial road which would require a significant upgrade, including larger intersections.


  • Greaves Road – Becoming Arterial Road

    over 2 years ago
    Map 3
    What is the issue?

    »In 2011, VicRoads advised Council that it had reviewed arterial roads in Casey, and recommended that three roads (Greaves Road, Hall Road and Pound Road) should be declared as arterial roads in 2011/12. As part of this process, Pound Road and Hall Road are now declared as Arterial Roads, and discussions regarding Greaves Road were being finalised prior to residents raising concerns.

    »Between March and July 2016, Council spent significant funds for Greaves Road out-of-schedule maintenance and remedial works in anticipation of Greaves Road Arterial Road Declaration.

    »Strategic links like Greaves Road carry significant regional traffic...

    What is the issue?

    »In 2011, VicRoads advised Council that it had reviewed arterial roads in Casey, and recommended that three roads (Greaves Road, Hall Road and Pound Road) should be declared as arterial roads in 2011/12. As part of this process, Pound Road and Hall Road are now declared as Arterial Roads, and discussions regarding Greaves Road were being finalised prior to residents raising concerns.

    »Between March and July 2016, Council spent significant funds for Greaves Road out-of-schedule maintenance and remedial works in anticipation of Greaves Road Arterial Road Declaration.

    »Strategic links like Greaves Road carry significant regional traffic volumes and put immense pressure on Council’s budget with more frequent than usual maintenance requirements.

    What is Council’s Role?
    »Roads that provide a regional or metropolitan arterial function typically form part of the Declared Arterial Road Network and come under the State’s direct responsibility through VicRoads.
    »In growth areas, arterial roads are typically constructed in stages - initially as a single carriageway local arterial and then handed over to VicRoads through the Arterial Road Declaration process as the traffic function of the road becomes more regional.

    »Over some years, Council has been working with VicRoads on the arterial road network in Casey that services the City and the broader community.
    »Greaves Road will ultimately be declared as an arterial road and is in the final stages of ‘handover’ to VicRoads as a Declared Arterial Road.

    »The handover process set by VicRoads requires Council to make improvements to the road (at Council’s cost, to the satisfaction of VicRoads) before VicRoads accept the responsibility for the road. For this reason, handover can take several years to achieve.

    What is Council’s position?

    »During the preparation of the South East Growth Corridor Plan in 2012, VPA (formerly known as the Metropolitan Planning Authority and before that, the Growth Areas Authority) further reinforced Greaves Road as a key east-west arterial connecting the Princes Freeway in the east and Pound Road in the west, then linking to the employment land in South Dandenong.

    »The South East Growth Corridor Plan was approved by the State Government and is a reference document in the Casey Planning Scheme. All government agencies involved in the planning of the south east growth corridor must adhere to the strategic intent of the document.

    »Greaves Road provides broader metropolitan benefits, and as such, it is appropriate that the State Road Corporation (VicRoads) accepts responsibility for the operation of the road.

    »In essence, Greaves Road status as a local road has been an interim position, with Greaves Road having been identified and planned for as a key arterial road which would require a significant upgrade, including larger intersections.

    Map showing Greaves Road as arterial road under South East Growth Corridor Plan
  • Berwick Waterways Precinct Structure Plan (PSP)

    over 2 years ago
    2.2
    What is the issue?

    »The Minister for Planning (through the Victorian Planning Authority - VPA) was responsible for the preparation of the Berwick Waterways Precinct Structure Plan (Berwick Waterways PSP) in 2014.

    »Through the development of the Berwick Waterways PSP and before the public consultation conducted in late July 2014, the VPA evaluated various intersection design alternatives, including a temporary roundabout and traffic signals. Council and VicRoads supported the extension of Ward Road (in the north) to Greaves Road because it would provide an important and safe link for motorists, public transport (buses), cyclists and pedestrians.

    »Based on the advice...

    What is the issue?

    »The Minister for Planning (through the Victorian Planning Authority - VPA) was responsible for the preparation of the Berwick Waterways Precinct Structure Plan (Berwick Waterways PSP) in 2014.

    »Through the development of the Berwick Waterways PSP and before the public consultation conducted in late July 2014, the VPA evaluated various intersection design alternatives, including a temporary roundabout and traffic signals. Council and VicRoads supported the extension of Ward Road (in the north) to Greaves Road because it would provide an important and safe link for motorists, public transport (buses), cyclists and pedestrians.

    »Based on the advice of VicRoads, which would have ultimate responsibility for Greaves Road, the VPA specified a four-legged roundabout with larger diameter with an additional northern leg connection via Ward Road, to the Berwick Waterways PSP. This information was available in the documentation that was part of the public consultation conducted by the VPA. Refer to the diagram below.

    »In adopting the Amendment, the Minister for Planning decided to exercise his power under section 20 (4) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. This decision was made to exempt himself from all the requirements of sections 17, 18 and 19 of the Act and the regulations in respect of Amendment C188 to the Casey Planning Scheme on the basis that:

    »“potentially affected parties have been given the opportunity to express their views regarding the amendment through a comprehensive non-statutory consultation process, their views have been taken into account in the preparation of the amendment, and any further consultation would be unlikely to alter the outcome.”

    What’s Council’s role?

    »The VPA undertook a public consultation process in late July 2014. Council officers attended a community information session held on 29 July 2014 to support the consultation, as is common practice.

    »On 16 September 2014, Council resolved to adopt a submission to the VPA raising a number of concerns with the exhibited version of the Berwick Waterways PSP but supported the PSP and associated amendment, subject to the appropriate resolution of these matters. There was a minimal reference to the roundabout in the submission as Council had no information beyond what was exhibited.

    »Council officers understand that negotiations between VicRoads and the VPA on the Greaves Road intersection continued after the public exhibition and were still taking place in October 2014. Council officers had limited involvement in the final discussions that the VPA was holding, as the VPA was finalising the Berwick Waterways PSP and supporting documentation to a tight timeframe. There was no mechanism or opportunity afforded to Council officers for a review of the amended roundabout proposal, nor any formal mechanism for the Council to consider the final Berwick Waterway PSP or the Development Contributions Plan.

    What’s Council’s position?
    »The VPA timeline for finalising the PSP appears to have been influenced by the impending State Government election held in late November 2014. Documentation for the planning scheme amendment was submitted to the then Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure on 20 October 2014 and the Amendment was adopted by the Minister on 4 November 2014, less than four weeks before the November election.

    »Council recognises that Casey is a longstanding, identified growth area under the State Government planning policy. It is necessary that residential growth and development is appropriately facilitated in these areas through appropriate planning and delivery of infrastructure, including arterial road networks.

    Berwick Waterways PSP drawing showing the future roundabout



  • Community Consultation

    over 2 years ago
    What is the issue?
    »Residents of Berwick Springs Estate in Narre Warren South have been voicing their concerns to Council and Council officers opposing the location of an upgraded roundabout at the corner of Greaves Road, and Berwick Springs Promenade in Narre Warren South.

    »Residents aired a lack of community consultation as one of the grievances relating to the roundabout upgrade project.

    What’s Council’s role?
    »The Minister for Planning (through the Victorian Planning Authority) was responsible for the preparation of the Berwick Waterways Precinct Structure Plan (Berwick Waterways PSP).

    »Council is responsible for the implementation of the Berwick Waterways PSP...

    What is the issue?
    »Residents of Berwick Springs Estate in Narre Warren South have been voicing their concerns to Council and Council officers opposing the location of an upgraded roundabout at the corner of Greaves Road, and Berwick Springs Promenade in Narre Warren South.

    »Residents aired a lack of community consultation as one of the grievances relating to the roundabout upgrade project.

    What’s Council’s role?
    »The Minister for Planning (through the Victorian Planning Authority) was responsible for the preparation of the Berwick Waterways Precinct Structure Plan (Berwick Waterways PSP).

    »Council is responsible for the implementation of the Berwick Waterways PSP through the issue of Planning Permits which are generally in accordance with the Berwick Waterways PSP.
    »The VPA undertook public consultation on the Berwick Waterways PSP, and the Developer Contributions Plan (DCP), including on the general location of the roundabout. However the full extent, detailed design and final location of the roundabout were not consulted on, nor did the State Planning Authority give Council the opportunity to review and provide formal comment on the gazetted version of the Berwick Waterways PSP.

    »The Draft Berwick Waterways PSP amendment was made available on the VPA (then MPA) and City of Casey websites. Printed versions of the amendment documents were also available at both the VPA and City of Casey offices throughout the submission period.

    »The Amendment Notice was published in The Star community newspaper on Tuesday 17 July 2014 and the Cranbourne Leader on Wednesday 16 July 2014.

    »Owners and occupiers within and adjoining the PSP area were sent letters by the VPA with a newsletter (dated 15 July 2014) explaining the amendment and outlining how submissions could be made.
    »A public consultation process was undertaken by the VPA in late July 2014. Council officers attended a community information session held on 29 July 2015 to support VPA’s consultation.

    What’s Council’s position?

    »Council officers had limited involvement in the final discussions that the VPA was holding, as the VPA was finalising the Berwick Waterways PSP and supporting documentation to a tight timeframe.

    »There was no mechanism or opportunity afforded to Council officers for a review of the amended roundabout proposal nor any formal mechanism for the Council to consider the final Berwick Waterway PSP or the Development Contributions Plan.

  • Roundabout Extension, Relocation and Traffic Lights

    over 2 years ago
    What is the issue?

    »The existing roundabout island on Greaves Road has a diameter of 15 meters. A Traffic and Transport study commissioned by the Victorian Planning Authority (VPA) for the Berwick Waterways PSP acknowledged the need for a larger intersection on Greaves Road to cater for the future demand as well as a safe traffic function.

    »Although an intersection controlled by traffic lights can be an alternative, the traffic analysis carried out by VicRoads suggested that the ultimate 40 meter, two-lane roundabout will have sufficient capacity to accommodate future traffic up to the year 2046.

    »It is forecast that...
    What is the issue?

    »The existing roundabout island on Greaves Road has a diameter of 15 meters. A Traffic and Transport study commissioned by the Victorian Planning Authority (VPA) for the Berwick Waterways PSP acknowledged the need for a larger intersection on Greaves Road to cater for the future demand as well as a safe traffic function.

    »Although an intersection controlled by traffic lights can be an alternative, the traffic analysis carried out by VicRoads suggested that the ultimate 40 meter, two-lane roundabout will have sufficient capacity to accommodate future traffic up to the year 2046.

    »It is forecast that the proposed extension and relocation will meet local and regional commuter needs for the next 20 years requiring no additional upgrades or modifications.

    What is Council’s role?

    »In response to the exhibited documents, Council officers understand that VicRoads specified to the VPA that the roundabout must be 40 meters by the AustRoads guidelines for a dual lane roundabout, to fit into the future arterial road design. The 40-meter roundabout design is consistent with other arterial road roundabouts in Casey’s municipal district, such as Sladen Street and Narre Warren-Cranbourne Road in Cranbourne.


    What is Council’s position?

    »Council officers supported the extension and relocation approach as an efficient use of public funds, and to minimise future inconvenience to residents and disruption to the transport network.

    »Council officers understand that a properly designed roundabout is a proven safe form of intersection control. In this case, VicRoads has advised that modeling has confirmed that the roundabout will operate very well, with minimal delays, especially during off-peak periods. Queues and delays will be lower than at an equivalent signalised intersection.

    »Council supports reducing traffic disruption and delays for both the residents of Berwick Springs and the broader City of Casey commuters. Through the extension of the Greaves Roundabout from a 15 to a 40-meter diameter, changes in traffic and congestion levels would occur. Increasing driving productivity and ensuring people spend less time in their cars and more time at their intended destination.
    »Another important factor in Council’s support for the extension is that the roundabout itself would not require future upgrades for a projected two decades.

  • Ecological Constraints – Dwarf Galaxias Habitat – Hallam Valley

    over 2 years ago
    What is the issue?

    »The Hallam Valley Contour Drain (HVCD) has significant environmental values associated with the habitat in the drainage system that includes a fish species, Dwarf Galaxias (Galaxiella pusilla), protected under Federal Legislation.
    »The Dwarf Galaxias is listed as Vulnerable under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 and Threatened under the Victorian Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988.

    »All landowners are required to consider works that have potential to disturb the habitat of the species and any development is required to gain the necessary approvals from the State and Federal Government where Dwarf Galaxias habitat is...

    What is the issue?

    »The Hallam Valley Contour Drain (HVCD) has significant environmental values associated with the habitat in the drainage system that includes a fish species, Dwarf Galaxias (Galaxiella pusilla), protected under Federal Legislation.
    »The Dwarf Galaxias is listed as Vulnerable under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 and Threatened under the Victorian Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988.

    »All landowners are required to consider works that have potential to disturb the habitat of the species and any development is required to gain the necessary approvals from the State and Federal Government where Dwarf Galaxias habitat is present.

    What’s Council's role?
    »Council is required to follow and enforce the Federal Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 as well as the State Victorian Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988.

    »Council believes in strong environmental protections to ensure vulnerable and threatened species such as the Dwarf Galaxias are not disturbed and flourish in their habitat.

    »Council officers understand that shifting the roundabout to the north would require wider bridge structures, which would cause extended lengths of dark, overshadowed areas under the bridge structures which is deemed unsuitable for the Dwarf Galaxias habitat.

    »In 2016, Council officers requested the developer undertake a targeted Dwarf Galaxias survey as part of a planning permit application process associated with the proposed removal of native vegetation for the upgraded roundabout.

    What’s Council's position?
    »The consultant engaged by the developer concluded that the current preferred option for the roundabout upgrade (as set out in the Berwick Waters PSP) will have the least potential impact on Dwarf Galaxias, and the fish habitat.

    »Any options to the North will likely have a more significant impact, particularly due to in-stream works required, and should be referred to the Federal Government for assessment.

    »There are also potential consequences and additional requirements that could be required by the Federal Government, should a northern option be pursued.

    »Council, for this reason, supports the decision to locate the roundabout as set out in the Berwick Waters PSP to avoid damage to the Dwarf Galaxias habitat, while also stopping a delay in the upgrade due to the requirements of Commonwealth Government assessment.

  • Drainage Constraints – Melbourne Water

    over 2 years ago
    What is the issue?

    »Melbourne Water’s Hallam Valley main drain runs through a large part of the area. It is a complex system that provides drainage, water quality enhancement and carries flood water from a very large catchment before entering Port Phillip Bay.

    »This area of Casey has been investigated over two decades to understand development feasibility and the associated constraints relating to drainage. The fragmented land ownership has held back the development of the area.

    »In 2014 when the VPA commenced planning for the area through the Berwick Waterways PSP, a preliminary Storm Water Management Plan was developed by...

    What is the issue?

    »Melbourne Water’s Hallam Valley main drain runs through a large part of the area. It is a complex system that provides drainage, water quality enhancement and carries flood water from a very large catchment before entering Port Phillip Bay.

    »This area of Casey has been investigated over two decades to understand development feasibility and the associated constraints relating to drainage. The fragmented land ownership has held back the development of the area.

    »In 2014 when the VPA commenced planning for the area through the Berwick Waterways PSP, a preliminary Storm Water Management Plan was developed by Stormy Water Solutions.

    What’s Council's role?

    »The Stormwater Management Plan was a preliminary assessment of the likely drainage requirements set by Melbourne Water and Council that would need to be met within any development proposal.

    »It was highlighted by the consultant that, given the complex nature of the Hallam Valley system, there were multiple obvious physical drainage constraints and the solution would be complex and involve significant development cost.

    What’s Council's position?

    »Council does not intend to interfere or reduce the current drainage requirements set by Melbourne Water. Council also supports and enforces The Stormwater Management Plan as a guideline for all development in the area. This is to ensure adequate drainage is planned in all future developments and reduces the safety risk posed by inadequate drainage.