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How has the 2011 Casey Housing Diversity Statement contributed to providing a greater range of housing types in new developments?

almost 8 years ago

The Casey Housing Diversity Statement was adopted by Council in January 2011 to encourage the development industry to provide a range of housing types in new developments, particularly smaller homes with one or two bedrooms and homes that include accessible features, which are often costly to alter for a person who has limited or impaired mobility.

This consultation has concluded.

  • icelady35 almost 8 years ago
    The problem with this is it seems to have given the developers in the area the right to squash everyone in like sardines, Berwick waters being a good example of this where you have these tiny little blocks. It should have been added that each development have a certain amount of each size block, not only for those who want smaller or larger but also to be of more benefit to the area.I saw all these signs going up for new housing estates and thought this is great, I will finally be able to get a block around 1000sm for less than half a mil, like they have been in Berwick. But when I spoke to agents, I was informed that none would be larger than 600sm and also in 2 cases that is was the requirement of Casey council that the blocks be this small. So maybe it would be relevant for some but this far out from the city, there should be more larger blocks available, thats why we moved out of the city.
  • Admin Commented Casey Administrator almost 8 years ago
    Thank you for your feedback. It is true that State and Local Government policy is to have smaller lots in order to increase the supply of housing in well-located, urban areas. Newly planned areas (i.e. Precinct Structure Plan areas) are planned by the State Government’s Growth Areas Authority, which mandates higher housing densities. The average lot size in Casey’s Precinct Structure Plan areas is 450 square metres.It is Council’s understanding that market drivers are also contributing to smaller lot sizes. Land is becoming increasingly expensive and new home buyers are willing to compromise on land size to get the house they want.The Casey Housing Strategy (2005) talks about maintaining the country-town feel of Casey with suburban breaks – that is, areas of larger lots within an urban context. You can see these breaks through parts of Hampton Park, Narre Warren and Berwick. Council will be reviewing the Casey Housing Strategy in 2012-13 and one of the objectives of the reviewed Housing Strategy will be to provide a range of lot sizes (small and large) in the existing areas of Casey. Part of current and future consultation will focus on where smaller and larger lots should be encouraged – do residents want to maintain suburban breaks and larger lots in urban areas; or are larger lots better located in semi-urban/rural areas (e.g. Lysterfield South, Narre Warren North and Harkaway in the north of Casey, and Cranbourne South, Devon Meadows and Coastal areas in the south)?
    • daniel over 7 years ago
      what larger lots?? some of the biggest lots you will ever see in an estate are about 600sqm (which is below average...), of which most are only because they're either on a corner or have a really bad slope etc. Yes some people will only want a smaller lot, but even then the size of some being flashed and advertised are 200 sqm lots... That is pathetically tiny and the Council needs to intervene before there is nothing on the Casey landscape but a sea of house roofs with no backyards or space to plant trees. Furthermore given the council's obvious strategy of packing everybody in like can of sardines, how are you supposed to provide the basic standard of living requirements when no childcare/medical facilities are also being built into these estates, let alone the extra infrastructure required for which you cant even find funding for ONE bus service to the Botanic Ridge estate which has been there for years and only getting bigger?
  • eb12 over 7 years ago
    There is no place in casey for people in wheelchairs 1 or 2 or more. It is need because the people are getting older and end up have problems finding them. that you have to move away from the area to find them. Footpath are the other problems in the new areas there is no footpaths for limited or impaired mobility.Land is getting smaller which makes hard to build housing for these people. The rooms are small too.
    • Admin Commented Casey Administrator over 7 years ago
      Thank you for contributing to our discussion. Council is also concerned that there are limited options for housing in Casey for people with limited or impaired mobility; and that it is often difficult and expensive to properly modify an existing dwelling for accessibility requirements. Council is also concerned that there may be residents living in unsuitable circumstances that could compromise their health and wellbeing because they cannot afford required modifications. Council recognises that improved accessibility in housing does not only benefit elderly persons and people in wheelchairs, but a wide range of people, including people with temporary injuries, illnesses or conditions that limited mobility, parents carrying young babies, and children beginning to learn how to walk.Whilst Council offers programs to assist residents to continue to live in their home as their accessibility needs change, it is recognised that more should be done at the forefront of housing construction to make the process of modification easier and more affordable when required. This is all the more important given Casey’s future population growth, particularly the ageing population and young children.In 2011, Council adopted the Casey Housing Diversity Statement, which advocates for an estimated 20 per cent of new ground floor dwellings to be accessible (including level access-ways, wider doorways, fully accessible bathroom facilities within either a single storey dwelling or a double storey dwelling in which all typical amenities and at least one bedroom are located on the ground floor). Council has also recently consulted with people with a disability and their families and carers, which raised similar issues. The consultation has contributed to a strategy that is being prepared by the Department of Human Services in partnership with the City of Casey to advocate for improving accessible housing.Council continues to advocate for improved accessibility in housing, particularly in new dwellings, through the Housing Diversity Statement. In the coming months, Council will also consider how the review of the Housing Diversity Statement can bring in some of the other issues you have raised to further improve accessibility in housing for Casey residents now and into the future. Please let us know if you have further feedback on how you think accessibility in housing can be improved.
    • Socialplanner over 7 years ago
      It's great to think about how to house people with disabilities. After all they are just people like you or me. At 5 years old 1:20 have a disability. At 80 years 1:5 of us will. Where do we live? Well like most people we want to live with our friends and families in he neighbourhood we always did. So you are right - good quality and dignified accommodation is appropriate.We should be able to choose between; our home we grew up in, nursing homes, retirement villages, flats, units, shared accommodation and even rooming houses depending on how we want to live, what support we need and what we can afford.And yes Eb12 all places should be able to be accessed by contiguous at grade pavement making it possible for everyone to walk / roll more easily and more often.It just makes sense and protects peoples health at the same time.
  • daniel over 7 years ago
    I agree completely with the other posters, yeah its good to have a few small lots/homes for people who cant afford the large ones, but when at every estate going up and especially looking at the Peets subdivision off craig's road in Cranbourne South, they are ALL tiny! Some are even 131 sqm! its going to make the entire surrounding area look like a slum with everyone building on top of each other. How on earth did this ever get approved?? Whats more is that theres not going to be any infrastructure improvements to the roads in the area to cope with the massive inflow of increased traffic and no children services or even a bus route in the Pearcedale area....
    • Admin Commented Casey Administrator over 7 years ago
      Thank you Daniel for both of your posts. The State Government Growth Areas Authority (GAA) is responsible for planning new estates through the Precinct Structure Plans which Council then implements. Whilst lot sizes and the location of infrastructure and services are determined through the GAA’s Precinct Structure Plans, Council continues to advocate for greater diversity and for the community’s expectations through the Casey Housing Strategy and the Casey Housing Diversity Statement. Council considers lots that are less than 200 square metres to be of a ‘medium density’ and advocates for these lots to be located within a 5-10 minute walk from current and future transport routes, shops and/or open space so that the benefits of living close to infrastructure and services can be maximised. Council also advocates for greater amounts of open space and wider streets to allow for canopy trees where they cannot be planted in residential lots.It is Council’s view that housing densities should be highest around clusters of infrastructure and services and decrease as you move further away. Council proposes to strengthen these objectives of diversity of lot sizes and densities in the review of the Casey Housing Diversity Statement, and in the future review of the Casey Housing Strategy. Council will be seeking further feedback from the community relating to its expectations for lot sizes and densities towards the end of the year as the review of the Casey Housing Strategy begins.Council understands the community’s frustrations with delays of infrastructure delivery and strongly advocates on behalf of the community to improve infrastructure and service delivery in Casey. Council’s view is that infrastructure and services should be delivered at the forefront of housing development to ensure that the community is not disadvantaged when they first move in to their home.
      • daniel over 7 years ago
        So are you claiming that the council has no say in the planning of new estates and that this is the role of the State Government? If so, then why would the council spend time and money on seeking community feedback or prepare a Housing strategy? Every single person I have talked to about land lot sizes these days are disgusted about how tiny they are and don’t like being crammed in like a pack of sardines. And if your community feedback was to say otherwise I’d highly be doubting the verifiability of the statistics not being ‘manipulated’ to suit council visions and budgets. About the ‘medium density’ however I could rattle of an endless list of new estates going up currently where there wouldn’t be any “transport routes, shops and/or open space so that the benefits of living close to infrastructure” within a half hour to full hour walk let alone 5-10 minutes… so why is it then that these estate plans keep on getting approved? Is it because the council planners just don’t care about following the council’s housing strategy or is it that the strategy is completely overlooked by the state government planners, in which case it’s all just a sham and a big waste of tax payers dollars?As for advocating greater amounts open space and wider streets for trees, I also wouldn’t consider this a success either, as far too many estates have a nice big road when you first drive into an estate, but once you get past the first 100 metres it immediately turns into a quagmire maze of tiny streets without a tree in sight and nothing but a sea of house roofs. I understand that trees take time to grow, but considering that not one person in an estate these days has enough space to plant a single large tree, its either the council or the developers are not planting enough for future growth in the few spots available within the overcrowded estates.In regards to the delay of infrastructure delivery this too seems to be poorly managed. It takes years to plan these estates and have them approved, followed by people waiting for the land to be titled and then the time to actually build on the property, yet the roads are seemingly already bursting at the seams. In which case its only get to get a lot worse than it is currently, especially with the sheer amount of new estates at the moment. So why does it then take so many years later for the council to then take action and perform a half hearted attempt to alleviate the bottlenecks? Councils collect large amounts of revenue from the developers of new estates for such building works, so that shouldn’t be the problem. Yet if it is then the council shouldn’t be taking on more than they can handle and either approve less estates or charge the developers more.If you could please advise when there would be an open council session discussing such policies that would be appreciated.
        • Admin Commented Casey Administrator over 7 years ago
          Thank you for your reply Daniel. Council is taking the time to prepare a Housing Strategy for two reasons. Firstly, Council is responsible for guiding the planning for housing growth in the established parts of Casey and in the non-urban areas in the Casey Foothills and the Coastal Villages (approximately 60% of land in the municipality). Secondly, whilst Council doesn’t have a role in planning new estates, it does have a role in advocating on behalf of the community’s needs and expectations. Council will be using community feedback regarding new housing developments to advocate to the State Government on a range of issues, which will also include the diversity of lot sizes available in new estates. Council’s advocacy also extends to the timely delivery of transport routes, shops and open space, as well as planning for wider streets and spaces throughout new estates (not just at the front) for tree planting. Council’s understanding is that smaller lot sizes are attractive to some groups in Casey and the Growth Areas Authority has developed a ‘small lot code’ to plan housing for these groups. On the other hand, Council recognises that other groups would still like the opportunity to purchase larger lots which are not always being provided for. Council recognises that delays in infrastructure delivery have been increasing over time and that this has a huge impact on the liveability of households in new estates. Council continually advocates for improvements to the ways in which infrastructure is funded and delivered and seeks to ensure that developer contribution costs do not add further impacts on purchase prices for home buyers. Council has also partnered with a range of other organisations to develop a pilot project that will see the delivery of a community facility in the Selandra Rise estate in Cranbourne East much sooner than if the facility was funded through normal means. In part, this project will be used to demonstrate alternative funding processes to deliver infrastructure at the forefront of housing development.Currently, there are no open sessions planned to discuss Council’s housing policies. Council will be undertaking consultation for the review of the Casey Housing Strategy in the 2012-13 financial year and will be continuing discussions on Council’s housing policies at that time.
          • daniel over 7 years ago
            That’s great that one of the twenty odd estates currently being built on is receiving a community centre, but what about the rest or existing estates, or more importantly regarding infrastructure about the traffic jams on the roads and the lack of public transport (of which service/time waiting on the Cranbourne train line would have to rank as Melbourne’s worst)? Council seems to know we’re already bursting at the seams and traffic is getting out of control, yet are approving endless new estates, and are obviously doing a horrific job of ‘advocating’ for the groups of people wanting anything other than shoe box sized lots of land. Which by being so small is just compounding the problem and of which Im sure if you were to ask anybody in the local community they’d all say it’s done purposely so as to allow the council to charge more rates, and no other reason. Once again if council really understands how the lack of infrastructure is having a huge impact on the liveability of the citizens then, why do they allow so many estates to be created? and if the traffic jams are coming about purely because of so many people coming to the area, than why don’t the council charge the developers more even if does cut down on the developers margins or slightly increases the purchase price, at least then the infrastructure will actually be there, not only for those that choose to build here, but also everyone else already in the shire. For instance have they ever tried to drive towards northbound on the South Gippsland highway when its wet? the traffic jams from the South Gippsland freeway bridge frequently go back past Hallam road and can take us much as twenty minutes to drive about 2 kilometres. And dont even mention Thompsons road which with the Western Port highway has for how many years of council inaction has ranked as all of Melbournes worst intersection, yet instead of doing anything about the road, the council has throw in at least another 5 new estates around that stretch of road, only making it even worse... Furthermore there are endless new estates going up in Cranbourne East and Clyde, yet nothing is has or even being done for people actually wanting to travel east or get to the Monash/Princes hwy, the traffic on the bridge at Berwick road is getting worse by the day, yet Im sure nothing is going to be done about that eitherAdditionally if the state government is just going to ignore the councils advocating for anything other than teenie tiny lots of land and tree-less landscapes then why would the council spend more worker time and money on consultation reviews for 2012-13? Are the comments from here even looked at/mentioned to councillors (even those not complimentary to the council actions), or is it all just for show by trying to give the masses the false impression that their voices are important and being heard, “so vote for us again”, when in reality the comments including this one will be completely dismissed out of hand when it comes to decision time?
            • Admin Commented Casey Administrator over 7 years ago
              Thank you for your comments Daniel. We value your contributions.Council continues to advocate to State and Federal Governments for improvements to transport infrastructure in Casey. We would encourage you to join Council’s campaign and contact your local Member of Parliament to take urgent action on behalf of all Casey residents.For more information on Council’s advocacy campaigns visit www.casey.vic.gov.au/advocacy
            • daniel over 7 years ago
              Yikes, its actually good to see some works finally being done on the Berwick road bridge over the Monash Freeway! They're only turning lane adjustments/extensions that are cheap and I thought of as something easy as and needing to be done 5 years ago, but at least its something.So after more than 4 months of community feedback for this topic, may I ask what has actually been provided to the councillors regarding this feedback and if their staunch 'advocating' has achieved anything? Also it seems from the lack updates and other new topics in general that community feedback is no longer sought after...
  • MickeyB over 7 years ago
    When these small new house get built on small blocks of land, they look good when there new, even tho you can see there squashed in togther, but lets look ahead in 15-20 years when the age starts to show on these houses and area, there just going to look like little ghettos in the suburbs.We shouldn't buy into the marketing stratagies used my developers and councils, with there Affordable Living packages. This is a propaganda to get as many blocks of land in per hectar. Short term win for developer making more money on selling more blocks of land and Long term win for the council with more houses to collect rates.Before we know it we are also going to have DHS sites pop up in new areas in Casey, eg Lynbrook.People of Casey unit and stop this, I work on DHS sites in the Bayside area and the violents in the area, with police constantly call, drug deals that go on and let along the rubbish that gets thrown out on a weekly bases.I understand there are alot of unfortunate people out there at no fault of there own living in these places and then there are others.......
  • Admin Commented Casey Administrator over 7 years ago
    Thank you to all who have contributed to conversations regarding Casey’s Housing Policies. The latest edition of the Community Update is now available in the library section of this forum. The Community Update summarises the results from the Housing Diversity Survey. These results will be used to inform the review of the Casey Housing Diversity Statement, to be completed in July 2012.Council has also endorsed the Rooming Houses Key Issues Paper that is also available in the library. Chapter 7 of the Rooming Houses Key Issues Paper summarises the results of all housing policy consultation undertaken since October 2011. The Rooming Houses Key Issues Paper will inform the preparation of a Rooming House Policy, to be completed in July 2012.
  • daniel over 7 years ago
    So can we ask where these Rooming houses are going to be located, so that we can all sell up now and move away from the soon to be affected areas? Or better yet, where do the councillors live? So that I can move nearby because I can certainly bet that they won’t be approving any to go up in their neighbourhood/area. A good friend of mine works for the department of community housing in East Melbourne, and has informed me that the only people in rooming housing are drug and alcohol addicts, and he’s always following up and helping the police deal with the tenants of whom are soley to blame for dramatic increases in the amount of home invasions and theft or sexual assaults that occur as soon as Rooming housing is placed somewhere. Also I don’t ‘buy it’ that councillors are looking out for people not able to afford accommodation, as nearly 100% of all rooming housing tenants are as a result of either their criminal activities and just coming out of jail and hence have no money, or as previously stated are drug and alcohol addicts, so their rent is subsidised and/or nearly wholly paid for the by the Government. So given that there is no need to provide cheap housing, because people in Rooming houses will have their rent paid/almost wholly subsidised for by the Government anyway, why else do we have to have accommodate with open arms these sorts of people into our community? And just as MickeyB also said, if others don’t wont their neighbourhood to become associated with the likes of Frankston that is full of community housing please state so now, because I can tell you from people in the know, that Rooming housing is even worse, and our communities/homes wont be safe for very long
    • Admin Commented Casey Administrator over 7 years ago
      Council is currently preparing a Rooming House Policy that will include objectives about the size, design and location of rooming houses that require a planning permit. The Rooming House Policy will be advertised later in the year and residents will be able to make a submission to the policy during this period. Council will provide information on the Casey Conversations page about how residents can make a submission when this occurs.
      • daniel over 7 years ago
        Will there be a mass mailout of each residents ability to make a submission for or against this, or is the intention that its announcement only be hidden on here where not many people know about it? Also as I asked though, given that occupants of rooming houses all have their rent wholly or virtually completely paid for by the Government, which dismisses councils claims that its to provide cheaper housing. Why is this being done when nearly every single person in the to be affected area would be deadset against it?
    • Socialplanner over 7 years ago
      Although many things are said about rooming houses the plain truth is that if you loose your job, and many many people have, and you are single, it's impossible to afford rent in the private market. The housing market is tight, expensive and prefers people with permanent well paid work.Does this make you an undesirable drug addict. Most likely not.But does it limit your choice of accommodation to smaller, cheaper and shared options, most likely yes.Its time for some compassion in this two speed economy where many local people are doing it tough. Loosing your job doesn't mean you should also be run out of town.Most rooming houses are in local streets and look to all appearances exactly like your house. Even the neighbours haven't noticed. Why if they had you would have read about some local crime wave in your local newspaper!
    • daniel over 7 years ago
      But SocialPlanner, if you knew anything rooming houses as your username suggets, you'd know just as well as I do that people with drug/gambling/alcohol addictions, or criminal convicts having just been released from prison, are given prioritisation for rooming houses and that the poor unfortunate people who lose their jobs through no fault of their own, simply go without because according to the Department of Human Services regulations, they 'dont have a problem' such as drugs, alochol, gambling. And as such those simply unemployed or in hard times are occasionally given community housing (which is very different to the 'Rooming' housing being proposed), but are more commonly forced to move in with relatives or caravan parks, whilst many who don’t deserve community housing also get to remain far longer than they should simply because the rules of DHS don’t allow staff to retest an individual’s status a year/s later. The whole system of Rooming housing is flawed and not there for those that most deserve/need it (same for community housing but thats not whats being discussed), and whilst I’m all for compassion of those that do deserve it, I have however no sympathy for addicts and criminals of which their own choice and actions have led them there, and certainly would not want them anywhere near my children. As for the two speed economy and unemployment comments, every single person in rooming houses will have their rent wholly or very nearly wholly subsidised and paid for by other taxpayers, and would end up paying at the most if at all, a whopping $50 a week. So no, there is no need to create an abundance of flashy brand new and free rooming homes given that the future tenants never have to pay rent anyway, and they can continue to use existing homes allocated to DHS, and the community’s money could then be much better spent on schools for children with disabilities or doctors, nurses etcAs for rooming housing looking just like others, I should arrange a time for you to meet a friend of mine in DHS, who you could drive around with and they'll pick out DHS houses just from looking, and then be able to go back to the office and confirm with uncanny accuracy. So yes they certainly do look different, but that’s still of far lesser concern then the fact my friend has to deal with the Police and justice court orders as they shift tenants between rooming houses because the tenants frequently get into physical assaults and stabbings of other tenants or neighbours.
  • sal about 7 years ago
    Why would we want ot continue to live in Casey when you have increased our rates by the amount you have done so this year ????? ARE YOU PEOPLE SERIOUS DO YOU PEOPLE LIVE IN THE REAL WORLD I ASK DO YOU REALLY KNOW WHAT THE COST OF LIVING IS AND NOW YOU SLUG US WITH A 50% INCREASE WOW . I would like to know what my rates are ging to get me this year thast any diffrent than last year ????? I await you reply
    • Admin Commented Casey Administrator about 7 years ago
      Hi Sal. Thanks for your comments.Highlights of the 2012/2013 Council budget include:2012/2013 Capital works program:Children’s services • Construction of a third kindergarten room, two maternal and child health consulting rooms and expansion of the community room at the Lynbrook Children’s Services Centre, Lynbrook • Completion of the $2.4m Children’s Services Centre at Marriott Waters Estate, Lyndhurst • Sports and leisure • Construction of two ovals, a car park and drainage works at Marriott Waters Estate, Lyndhurst ($2.04m) • Endeavour Hills Leisure Centre gymnastics facilities upgrade, Endeavour Hills ($850,000) • Casey Fields rugby pavilion development, Cranbourne East ($625,000) • Playground improvements ($500,000) • Sweeney Reserve shared path construction, Berwick ($465,000) • Construction of a new netball court at Kalora Park Reserve, Narre Warren North ($235,191) • Carlisle Park oval and pavilion ($230,000) • Improved Equestrian Trails ($200,000) • Grices Road Reserve improvements, Berwick ($200,000) • New petanque clubrooms at Sydney Pargeter Reserve, Endeavour Hills ($161,524) • Design of the Hunt Club Estate cricket oval and pavilion, Cranbourne ($130,000) • Upgrade of selected ovals amenities at Casey Fields ($95,000) Roads and drainage • $2.9 m for road rehabilitation projects • Construction of North Road, from Sweet Wattle Drive to Fisheries Road, Devon Meadows ($2.26m) • $2.1 m for road resealing • $2.05 m for kerb and channel and drainage improvements • $900,000 for the Local Area Traffic Management Program including Endeavour Drive Local Traffic Management Scheme ($280,000) and Lyndhurst Estate Local Traffic Management Scheme ($220,000) • Upgrade of the Ernst Wanke Road/Harkaway Road, Berwick intersection ($800,000 - delivered in conjunction with a grant under the Federal Nation Building - Black Spot Program) • Linking Paths Program at various locations ($750,000) including works at Fox Road, Narre Warren North ($250,000) and Pound Road (south side) Hallam Road to Rivergum Rise ($456,000) • Pedestrian crossing at Gloucester Avenue, Berwick ($100,000) Open spaces • New street tree planting across Casey ($230,000) • Construction of public toilet facilities at Pioneers Park, Berwick ($200,000) • Upgrading park furniture across Casey ($170,000) • Implementation of the J&P Cam Recreation Reserve, Cranbourne master plan including landscape works ($141,000) • Landscaping works at Gunns Road Reserve, Hallam ($100,000) • Landscaping works in Cranbourne North local parks including Portofino Drive, Lawless Drive and Hoystead Avenue ($86,000) • Improvements at foreshore areas ($66,000) 2012/2013 Services:• An increase in the delivery of home delivered meals to 38,000 meals, with no increase to meal fees to maintain affordability • An increase of over 16,000 hours of home care, personal care and respite care • Provision for up to 2,000 additional maternal and child health appointments • Eligible children to access an increase in kindergarten hours from 12 hours per week to 15 hours per week • More kindergarten places and an increase in kindergarten hours to 63,000 hours
      • daniel over 6 years ago
        Dang thats alot of millions of dollars in taxpayers money being thrown around on clubs for non-essential necessities at parks and ovals considering what we already have.I also notice though that this fails to mention the extra amount of money flooding into the council thanks to the million and one new housing developments being approved and going in. There shouldn’t be a need to raise rates by one cent given all this extra money pouring in that very few other councils get to enjoy. So given that we have all these types of expenses and projects to fund every year, as this list doesn’t show anything that’s dropped off and not longer being funded/incurring costs, who knows why all of a sudden they need to spend so much more, to the point that despite all the extra money being raised thanks to the manic housing construction approvals, why was there a need for any increase to the rates let alone one so dramatically high…?