What is a Green Wedge?

The Western Port Green Wedge is one of Melbourne’s 12 Green Wedges. The Green Wedges are generally located on the outskirts of Melbourne outside the urban growth boundary and separate Melbourne’s growth areas. Green Wedges, unlike parks and open spaces, are active, living areas that include agriculture, areas of environmental significance and lifestyle living.

What is the Draft Casey Western Port Green Wedge Management Plan?

The Draft Casey Western Port Green Wedge Management Plan (The Plan) is a strategic framework which will guide the management of the southern primarily rural areas of the City of Casey over the next 20 years. The initial draft of the Plan had been prepared in partnership with the Cardinia Shire Council, which shares the Western Port Green Wedge with the City of Casey. However, due to differences between the Councils in relation to the planning of the Green Wedge the Cardinia Shire Council resolved to withdraw from the partnership. The Plan is now primarily focused on the City of Casey. It separates the Green Wedge into five precincts.

Why do we need the Plan?

Green Wedges are subject to intensive pressures for urban development and change, as they are located on the edge of a city of around five million people. There are often competing pressures for urban development, hobby farms and subdivision, tourism, greyhound and horse racing industry uses, intensive agriculture and infrastructure. A Green Wedge Management Plan identifies these pressures and with local community input, develops proposals to deal with them. 

Does the Plan propose further rural subdivision?

The initial draft Plan did propose some areas for increased levels of subdivision. The City of Casey consulted with the State Government about reducing minimum lot sizes to accommodate increased subdivision in the Green Wedge. The State Government and existing State Planning Policy do not support additional subdivision in the Green Wedge.

Local councils are required to prepare and adopt Green Wedge Management Plans. The support of the State Government and both Houses of Parliament would be needed to allow further subdivision in the Green Wedge. Therefore, despite the City of Casey’s efforts over several years to pursue increased subdivision in the Western Port Green Wedge, ultimately Council was required by the State to complete the Plan in a form that is consistent with State policy. Based on the clear feedback from the State Government, Council Officers removed the recommendations related to increased subdivision from the finalised Plan that has now been adopted by Council.